Tax Insights

Your Guide to State, Local, Federal, Estate + International Taxation

Recently moved? Be sure you do this.

When COVID-19 hit the U.S. earlier this year, millions of employees were told to pack up their things and work from home. Without having to commute to work each day, many have decided to pack up their homes and move out of the “big city” for a lower cost of living. If this sounds familiar, you should first notify the post office that services your old address. If you did not file your 2019 tax return under your new address, you should change your address by filing the appropriate forms.

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To notify the IRS of a change in address, simply fill out form 8822* and send it to the appropriate IRS center. This same form is used to for individual tax returns as well as gift, estate, or generation-skipping transfer tax returns. The instructions on page 2 will help you determine which IRS center you should file with, which is based on the address you recently moved from. Likewise, be sure to file the necessary form with your state Department of Revenue. For Arizonans, use form 822 from the Arizona Department of Revenue’s website.

Business Taxpayer

If your business has a new address, this should be reported directly to the IRS by completing IRS form 8822-b. Similar to form 8822 previously mentioned, you will be asked to provide basic information, including your old address and your new address. You can also change a spouse’s address with the same form.

Not all post offices will forward government issued checks. Therefore, updating your address with the IRS could save you hours trying to track down your tax return issued by check, or potentially another stimulus check, should congress pass another relief package.

If you need assistance, contact your Henry+Horne tax professional for more details.

*The IRS is currently unable to process change of address forms but Arizona is processing them.

Christopher Cluff

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