What employers need to know about 401(k) compensation

When administering their 401(k) plan, one of the most common mistakes that employers make is allocating plan contributions to a participant account using the incorrect employee compensation. The most common occurrence is when an employer mistakenly excludes forms of compensation such as bonuses, overtime, or commissions that are defined as eligible compensation in the company’s …

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Plan terminations and partial plan terminations

Many plan participants may be surprised to learn that their employer can discontinue their 401k plan at their own discretion. The IRS considers a plan terminated once an official date of termination is established by the sponsor, the benefits and liabilities under the plan are determined, and all assets are distributed as soon as administratively …

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Contribution Schedule

An audit for an employee benefit plan, specifically a 401k plan, consists of many different tests and inquiries being performed. One schedule however, is always needed for the audit: a contribution remittance schedule. You might be wondering, “What exactly is a contribution schedule and why is it important enough to discuss in a standalone blog …

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Form 5500: What you need to know

Form 5500 is an annual return/report that employee benefit plans are required to file with the Department of Labor’s (DOL) Employee Benefit Security Administration (EBSA) division. Employee benefit plans subject to Employee Retirement Income Security’s Act (ERISA) standards are required to file Form 5500 on an annual basis. This report serves to satisfy necessary disclosures, …

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Does your employee benefit plan need an audit?

If your Company sponsors an employee benefit plan (this includes 401(k) plans), an audit of that plan may be required. What triggers the need for an audit? The number of participants. Plans with 100 or more participants at the start of the plan year are considered “large” and generally require an annual audit, while plans …

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Preparing for your 401(K) audit

Proper preparation for your year-end 401(K) audit can lead to a much smoother and effective audit experience for both your company and your auditor. A constant line of communication leading into the audit will allow both parties to be as efficient as possible, especially when it comes to performing fieldwork. In addition to what your …

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How to Prepare for Your 401(k) Audit

There are a few simple steps that can be taken during the planning phase of the audit in order to gain efficiencies during the fieldwork phase. You should be in communication with your auditor before the Plan’s year-end date. This is the best time to come to an agreement about the terms, timing and fees …

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Full Scope vs. Limited Scope Audits

When a 401(k) or other retirement plan requires an annual audit, a plan administrator may have a choice to engage an audit firm to perform a full-scope audit or a limited scope audit of the financial statements. To be qualified for a limited scope audit, a bank or insurance carrier must act as a trustee …

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Enrollment Documentation

Did you know that one of the most common errors found in a 401K audit is due to a lack of proper documentation of enrollment? When a company is required to have their 401K plan audited it is a good idea to make sure that there are proper procedures as well as documentation in place …

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